Podiatrist - Annapolis
139 Old Solomons Island Road, Suite C
Annapolis, MD 21401

P: (410) 224-4448
F: (443) 949-9539


The information on this site is provided for your assistance only; this site does not provide podiatric advice.  You should never diagnose or treat yourself for a podiatric condition based on the information provided herein, and the information is not provided for that purpose.  Likewise, you should never determine that treatment is unnecessary based on this information.  The information contained herein is not a substitute for podiatric care provided by a licensed podiatric professional.  The information provided herein is not podiatric, medical or professional advice.  This site does not create a doctor-patient relationship.

JAMES M. MCKEE, PODIATRY GROUP OF ANNAPOLIS, PA AND PODIATRY GROUP OF ANNAPOLIS AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTER. LLC (collectively, “PGOA”), expressly disclaims all warranties of any kind, whether express or implied, related to any products offered for sale on this web site.  PGOA further expressly disclaims any product warranties of effectiveness or fitness for any particular purpose or use.  You are solely responsible for your use of, or reliance on, any products offered for sale herein, and any consequences arising out of such use or reliance.  In no event will PGOA be liable for any damages resulting from use of or reliance on any such products, whether based on warranty, contract, tort or any other legal theory. 

This Website, and the information contained herein, is provided to you as a service for use at your sole risk. 

If you are feeling ill, please call your primary care physician, or other healthcare provider.  In the case of an emergency, please go to the nearest hospital.

Cysts are fluid-filled masses under the skin. Common cysts of the feet include synovial cysts, ganglia, and cutaneous mucoid cysts.

Most foot cysts are located under the skin, although occasionally they appear in tendon or bone. Synovial or ganglionic cysts are connected to a nearby joint or tendon, which makes them harder to treat. Mucoid cysts are not connected to a joint. Most cysts lead to mild pain as a result of the pressure created by wearing shoes. When any of these cysts enclose or press on a nerve, they can cause a sharp pain. X-rays, ultrasound, MRI, or CT scans are common methods for diagnosing cysts in the feet.

The best way to prevent cysts from forming is to wear well-fitted, comfortable shoes and avoid repeated foot injuries. Persistent ganglion cysts can be treated by numbing the area and extracting the fluid inside. A steroid or hardening agent may then be injected into the cyst to try to prevent it from filling again.

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