Podiatrist - Annapolis
139 Old Solomons Island Road, Suite C
Annapolis, MD 21401

P: (410) 224-4448
F: (443) 949-9539


The information on this site is provided for your assistance only; this site does not provide podiatric advice.  You should never diagnose or treat yourself for a podiatric condition based on the information provided herein, and the information is not provided for that purpose.  Likewise, you should never determine that treatment is unnecessary based on this information.  The information contained herein is not a substitute for podiatric care provided by a licensed podiatric professional.  The information provided herein is not podiatric, medical or professional advice.  This site does not create a doctor-patient relationship.

JAMES M. MCKEE, PODIATRY GROUP OF ANNAPOLIS, PA AND PODIATRY GROUP OF ANNAPOLIS AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTER. LLC (collectively, “PGOA”), expressly disclaims all warranties of any kind, whether express or implied, related to any products offered for sale on this web site.  PGOA further expressly disclaims any product warranties of effectiveness or fitness for any particular purpose or use.  You are solely responsible for your use of, or reliance on, any products offered for sale herein, and any consequences arising out of such use or reliance.  In no event will PGOA be liable for any damages resulting from use of or reliance on any such products, whether based on warranty, contract, tort or any other legal theory. 

This Website, and the information contained herein, is provided to you as a service for use at your sole risk. 

If you are feeling ill, please call your primary care physician, or other healthcare provider.  In the case of an emergency, please go to the nearest hospital.

Flat feet are a common condition of the foot structure. In infants and toddlers, prior to walking, the longitudinal arch is not developed, and flat feet are normal. Most feet are flexible and an arch appears when children begin standing on their toes. The arch continues to develop throughout childhood, and by adulthood most people have developed normal arches.

Flat feet are generally associated with pronation, a leaning inward of the ankle bones toward the center line. Shoes of children who pronate, when placed side by side, will lean toward each other (after they have been worn long enough for the foot position to remodel their shape).

Many people with flat feet do not experience pain or other problems. When pain in the foot, ankle, or lower leg does occur, especially in children, the feet should be evaluated.

Painful progressive flatfoot, otherwise known as tibialis posterior tendonitis or adult-acquired flatfoot, refers to inflammation of the tendon of the tibialis posterior. This condition arises when the tendon becomes inflamed, stretched, or torn. Left untreated, it may lead to severe disability and chronic pain. People are predisposed to tibialis posterior tendonitis if they have flat feet or an abnormal attachment of the tendon to the bones in the midfoot.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, icing, physical therapy, supportive taping, bracing, and orthotics are common treatments for painful progressive flatfoot. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In some cases, a surgery may need to be performed to repair a torn or damaged tendon and restore normal function. In the most severe cases, surgery on the midfoot bones may be necessary to treat the associated flatfoot condition.

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