Podiatrist - Annapolis
139 Old Solomons Island Road, Suite C
Annapolis, MD 21401
 

P: (410) 224-4448
F: (443) 949-9539

 

The information on this site is provided for your assistance only; this site does not provide podiatric advice.  You should never diagnose or treat yourself for a podiatric condition based on the information provided herein, and the information is not provided for that purpose.  Likewise, you should never determine that treatment is unnecessary based on this information.  The information contained herein is not a substitute for podiatric care provided by a licensed podiatric professional.  The information provided herein is not podiatric, medical or professional advice.  This site does not create a doctor-patient relationship.

JAMES M. MCKEE, PODIATRY GROUP OF ANNAPOLIS, PA AND PODIATRY GROUP OF ANNAPOLIS AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTER. LLC (collectively, “PGOA”), expressly disclaims all warranties of any kind, whether express or implied, related to any products offered for sale on this web site.  PGOA further expressly disclaims any product warranties of effectiveness or fitness for any particular purpose or use.  You are solely responsible for your use of, or reliance on, any products offered for sale herein, and any consequences arising out of such use or reliance.  In no event will PGOA be liable for any damages resulting from use of or reliance on any such products, whether based on warranty, contract, tort or any other legal theory. 

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Adult-acquired flatfoot or posterior tibial tendon dysfunction usually leads to a gradual loss of the arch. The posterior tibial muscle is a deep muscle in the back of the calf and has a long tendon that extends from above the ankle and attaches into several sites around the arch of the foot. The muscle acts like a stirrup on the inside of the foot to help support the arch. The posterior tibial muscle stabilizes the arch and creates a rigid platform for walking and running. If the posterior tibial tendon becomes damaged or tears, the arch loses its stability and as a result, collapses, causing a flatfoot.

Surgery is often performed to give the patient a more functional and stable foot. Several procedures may be required to correct a flatfoot deformity, depending on the severity of the problem. These may include:

  • Tenosynovectomy—a procedure to clean away (debridement) and remove any of the inflamed tissue around the tendon.
  • Osteotomy—removal of a portion of the heel bone (calcaneus) to move the foot structure back into alignment.
  • Tendon Transfer—in which replacement fibers from another tendon are inserted to help repair damage.
  • Lateral Column Lengthening—A procedure that implants a small piece of bone, usually removed from the hip, outside of the heel bone to create the proper bone alignment and rebuild the arch.
  • Arthrodesis—Fusing of one or more bones together to eliminate any joint movement, which stabilizes the foot and prevents any further deterioration or damage.



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